A parallel Worlds

Monday April 27 2015 / Art & Design

Time to sit back, relax and admire the amazing macro photography of Singapore-based snapper Nicky Bay.


Cicadae Parasite Beetle


Fungus Weevil

Bay has been shooting these magnificent macro shots of creepy crawlies in and around the Southeast Asian island country since 2008 and posting them via his website
Macro Photography in Singapore.


Lantern bug

Having started out with a Nikon D80 camera and Tamron 90mm macro lens, Bay briefly used a Nikkor 200mm because of the smaller lens diameter, before returning to the Tamron 90mm on a D800 camera which he uses 99 per cent of the time today.


Huntsman Spider consuming prey exposed under ultraviolet light for 20 seconds

Nick has made a nice graphic of his macro set-up here:


The photographer, pictured above, says: “Despite being an urban jungle, Singapore has an abundance of macro photography opportunities. Its tropical climate provides a warm environment for most insects to thrive in.


Green pergesa hawkmoth

He adds: “Keep a keen lookout for little critters, for they could be just beside you, even in your home!”


Longhorn beetle

Every year, Bay makes a few trips to the tropical rainforests in the region to take advantage of the different diversity of critters that they offer compared to the Singapore forests.


Bioluminescent Fungi

In 2014 alone, he made no fewer than 46 field trips, taking 20,000 shots along the way.


Eye of a Crested Lizard

Last year also saw Bay featured for the first time in an overseas photography exhibition, in France.


Ladybird Mimic Spider

He has equally started working more with ultraviolet light that he employs to reveal the natural fluorescence of the various organisms he comes across.


Heavy Jumper

To view more of this highly talented photographer’s work, you can follow him via his Facebook page, Flickr account and, of course, his website.

Suggested by
Steven Rogers

Monday March 2 2015 / Science & Technology

In Roald Dahl’s classic children’s story Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Willy Wonka takes a wide-eyed Charlie Bucket on a ride in his “great glass lift”.

“This isn't just an ordinary up-and-down lift!” declares Wonka proudly. “This lift can go sideways and longways and slantways and any other way you can think of!”


It turns out Wonka’s lift – dubbed the Wonkavator in the first movie adaptation – wasn't just the fruits of Dahl’s fertile imagination.

German conglomerate ThyssenKrupp have unveiled plans for their own omnidirectional lift – or elevator – called MULTI.

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