A parallel Worlds

Sunday May 17 2009 / Art & Design


There cannot be many now with an internet connection who have not heard of Susan Boyle. Her performance on Britain’s Got Talent TV show has attracted over 11 million views (and growing) on just one clip on YouTube . . .  and there are many!



If you have not seen Susan Boyle’s performance click on the image above, and if you have it is well worth another look as much to see the surprise on Simon Cowell’s sceptical face as it is to hear her amazing voice.

This is how Minette Marrin describeb Boyle’s performance in an article in The Times.

"An unsympathetic person, by contrast, might have sneered slightly, but the derision and jeering contempt that actually met this poor woman, seconds later, when she appeared on stage was quite shockingly brutal, especially for these sentimental times. She might as well have been a martyr in a Roman arena. As she clumsily answered a few questions, and said she wanted to be like Elaine Paige, TV cameras filmed open contempt on the faces of the young audience and there were audible boos and jeers. Worse still, the judges were also laughing at her, Simon Cowell rolling his eyes in affected disbelief and Piers Morgan openly sneering. All this because a plain and middle-aged lady, the living antithesis of youth and cool, had the effrontery to enter a talent contest.

Yet Miss Boyle, with her strange serenity, seemed oddly untroubled. . .

As a nation, as individuals, we don’t sing enough. We should be inspired by the surprising Susan Boyle."

You can learn more about the sensational Susan Boyle on wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_Boyle




Paul Potts stunned the judges and audiences in a similar fashion on the same show. Paul was a manager at a Carphone Warehouse store who went on to win Britain's got Talent in 2007 and released a No.1 in the classical charts.

Potts also said in a recent interview that he would like to sing a duet with Susan Boyle.

For more information on Paul Potts  wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Potts

It just goes to show, you really can't judge a book by its cover.

Suggested by
Maximilian Büsser